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“premise” vs. “premises”

19 Mar

 

Notice to dumbasses of the world!

 

These are two of the most commonly misunderstood words in the English language; they're even used incorrectly in trade publications — by "professional" writers and editors, as well as on signage. The difference is very simple, so there should be no confusion.

 

premise A proposition upon which an argument is based or from which a conclusion is drawn.

 

premises 1. Land and the buildings on it.

                  2. A building or part of a building.

 

The word "premises" is not a plural for "premise." Get over it…get with the program! Smarten-up your language skills — editors and everybody else!    

 

About Grammar Nazi

Marketing specialist focusing on concept development for new products and services. University degree in editorial journalism. Major corporate and brand experience with one of the world's largest and best advertising agencies.
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Posted by on March 19, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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