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Daily Archives: December 9, 2011

“premise” vs. “premises”

 

This is a repeat of an August 27th post to correct an oversight on one word…thanks to sharp-eyed reader Adam.

Notice to dumbasses of the world!

 

These are two of the most commonly misunderstood words in the English language; they're even used incorrectly in trade publications — by "professional" writers and editors, as well as on signage. The difference is very simple, so there should be no confusion.

 

The wrong usage…dumbass example:

                                           

premise A proposition upon which an argument is based or from which a conclusion is drawn.

 

premises 1. Land and the buildings on it.

          2. A building or part of a building.

 

The word "premises" is not a plural for "premise." Get over it…get with the program! Smarten-up your language skills — editors and everybody else!

 
 
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Posted by on December 9, 2011 in Uncategorized