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Daily Archives: September 9, 2011

“actually” overdose!

 

I can't take it anymore…

 

…anybody and everybody peppering their talk with the word "actually."

 

With few exceptions, the word "actually" isn't needed — almost ever; and most certainly doesn't help our understanding of what is being discussed or explained.

 

Its classic purpose was to emphasize surprise or assurance about something that might be unbelievable.

 

But somebody somewhere has burned this word into the vocal chords of too many people who seem to think it makes them appear smart. And now we hear it 24/7 from the minions who have no appreciation of our language.

 

 
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Posted by on September 9, 2011 in Uncategorized

 

Last Chance to Vote

 

Today!

 

Today is the last chance to vote for Most Valuable Minnesota Blogger — if you believe that RedPencilworks is important. It's in the "Everything Else" category:

 

http://minnesota.blogger.cbslocal.com/most-valuable-blogger/vote/misc/

 

 
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Posted by on September 9, 2011 in Uncategorized

 

“aint” or “ain’t”

 

The most famous non-word in our language!

 

Where did it come from? If it's a contraction, what are its root words?

 

Most recognizable contractions come together from real words; so what are the real word sources of "aint"? Moreover, if there are no real-word sources, how can we possibly insert an apostrophe ('t)…like saying "ay not"?

 

"Aint" seems to have its roots as a substitute for "isn't" or "aren't". But its usage is most common among people with low language skills and minimal education.

 

With or without an apostrophe (aint vs. ain't) is a mystery. Its usage is ridiculous and extremely low-brow. But here's a brief description from Wiki:

 

Ain't is a colloquialism and contraction for "am not", "is not", "are not", "has not", and "have not". In some dialects ain't is also used as a contraction of "do not", "does not", and "did not". The usage of ain't is a perennial subject of controversy in English. Widely used by many people, and found in most dictionaries, its use is often considered to be informal, nonstandard, or improper.

 
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Posted by on September 9, 2011 in Uncategorized